Girls with Asperger's may appear to be fairly "normal", but the problems will often be manifested through mental difficulties such as depression, anxiety, eating disorders, compulsive behavior and attention problems. An earlier diagnosis would have given me and those around me a better understanding of my vulnerabilities and strengths.

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This is what an anonymous girl of 18 years writes in a post on Aftenposten.no

She says that she had to wait until she became an adult, more specifically a week after she turned 18, to get this diagnosis. At that time she had already struggled with significant difficulties in her life for many years. 

She writes:

I found my place on the autism spectrum that day. Confused and relieved, but somewhat disappointed, I left child and adolescent psychiatry to start a new chapter in my life.

She wished she had been understood earlier. 

 

Autism is hidden behind the additional difficulties

She tells:

I am incredibly grateful for who I am today, but I should have been without some of the stops on my journey. If I had been diagnosed earlier, I might never have been introduced to my companion - the eating disorder - or lived the majority of my youth in isolation.

An important point that she points out is that girls with Asperger's can "look normal", but that the underlying difficulties appear in the form of additional difficulties.

Girls with Asperger's may appear to be quite "normal", but the problems will often be manifested through mental difficulties such as depression, anxiety, eating disorders, compulsive behavior and attention problems, she writes.

 

Girls with autism are discovered too late

There is little doubt that the girl who writes the article on Aftenposten.no is not alone.

In the article on Aftenposten.no, the author behind the post expresses precisely this concern: that many girls are discovered too late. She says that girls with Asperger's appear to be less autistic than boys, and therefore may be more difficult to diagnose - but that the difficulties are just as real.

The girls like to hide their weak social skills by taking on a role in a play and writing the script by memorizing the social rules.

Such a play can be terribly tiring in the long run, in addition to the fact that it does not necessarily work very well.

 

Reason for optimism?

She also writes about her experience that our society is not designed for people with a differently structured brain - but also that there are reasons for optimism:

Fortunately, we live in a time where many see our strengths and allow ourselves to triumph in both school and workplace, she writes.

In some workplaces there is even one requirements that employees have Asperger's.

 

Source

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