Major General Leif Sverre Rosén was interviewed in Dagsrevyen on 16 January 2014 about his experiences with mental health problems.

Image: Screenshot from the tv-program, nrk.no


 

- An indescribably painful feeling

Leif Sverre Rosén is known as a major general and surgeon. In this clip from NRK, he talks about how it can be experienced to have a depression: 

- It was chaotic in my head. I eventually felt very sad. An indescribably painful feeling inside me. 

It is not only the emotions that are affected, but all organ systems are set in motion, Rosén continues. It can be, for example, in the form of muscle stiffness, sore joints, upset stomach, sleep problems, palpitations, sweating and so on.

- It was very difficult at all to get started in the morning. I think it was good to fall asleep in the evening, and I really dreaded waking up in the morning. I had enough to do the daily necessities. But such a situation also drains you physically of strength, so that physical exertion that I had practiced before was difficult to carry out.

 

Difficult to seek psychological help

- I thought that I should manage this myself, and therefore I did not really seek help in time.

- It was not possible for my loved ones to handle me in such a situation. I became very intense. I really needed praise, to get positive feedback. In the end, they had to get tired of it. But it's not just about putting it behind you, when you get ill enough. 

- What is required in such a situation is simply professional help. 

And you got it?

- I got [professional help] at Modum (i.e., a specialized treatment facility in Norway).

 

- Severe depression affects as many men as women

NRK.no has previously covered the case, and then also had an interview with professionals at the treatment center Modum Bad.

- The experts at Modum Bad now believe that severe depression affects as many men as women. And it is especially men from 45 years and up, who are at risk, writes NRK.no.

At the darkest end of a severe depression, more men than women take their own lives. According to the Norwegian Institute of Public Health, the risk of suicide is between two and three times higher for men than it is for women.

Rosén is asked if he ever thought about taking his own life.

- I was thinking. I just have to admit. But from there to actually do it, is a distance. I have nice children and grandchildren and I feel I have a lot to live for.

- I have chosen life and I am happy about that, says Rosèn.

 

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