The "school losers" do not exist. We invented them. A child full of desire for learning, talent and joy can quickly be reduced to a problem: One who does not "manage what everyone else can do".

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This is something that Selma Moren, debate leader in Dagsavisen.no, writes in a thought-provoking post on the Norwegian news outlet Dagsavisen.no

 

Difficulties associated with dyscalculia

The author of the article herself has dyscalculia. She writes:

I'm 24 years old, but I can not tie my shoelaces. I do not understand the clock on the wall. I have to count on my hand if someone asks me for a simple piece of math.

I also graduated from high school with good grades, have a bachelor's degree in journalism and work as a debate leader in this newspaper.

When I tell my story, I do it because it is an undercommunicated one. Although about thirty percent of us have learning disabilities, we lack a broader picture of who these students are.

 

Children can quickly be reduced to a problem at school

With this, the post takes as a starting point the way in which students with learning difficulties are met in school. Selma Moren writes: 

A child full of desire for learning, talent and joy can quickly be reduced to a problem: One who does not "manage what everyone else can do". It's a terrible label to carry around for ten years.

She points out that there is both little knowledge and little focus on dyscalculia in Norwegian schools, which helps to make the problem bigger than it should have been.

 

A congenital failure

We hardly talk about it compared to dyslexia, but about five percent of us have it. It is innate, lifelong and hereditary. It is not a mental blockage or lack of motivation, but simply a failure in the interaction between brain functions. 

It is a very readable post, which is highly relevant. The post includes the following invitation: 

As long as we continue to measure everyone by the same standards, students with great academic potential will drop out. This will put a burden to society, not to mention to individuals' self-esteem and future prospects.

It should not be necessary to memorize something your brain is not going to learn.

 

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