Schizoid personality disorders are characterized by being shy, showing withdrawal from contact, showing little emotion, preferring imagination and solitary activities.

Photo: by Haydn Golden on Unsplash


 

Symptoms of schizoid personality disorder

A personality disorder is characterized by abnormalities in the personality. The condition manifests itself already in adolescence and continues into adulthood.

Schizoid personality disorders are characterized by being shy, showing withdrawal from contact, showing little emotion, preferring imagination and solitary activities.

The person is introverted and withdraws from social contexts, can often live in isolation and seems to have little need for emotional contact with others. There is little interest in sexuality. On the other hand, the person spends a lot of energy on other interests and hobbies, such as stamps or other introverted activities.

They can work well in jobs that can be done in solitude, and are often more technically interested than concerned with human relationships.

 

According to the diagnostic tool SCID-II, schizoid personality disorder is characterized by the following traits

 

  1. Neither wants nor enjoys close relationships, nor to be a member of a family. 
  2. Almost always chooses activities that involve not interacting with others. 
  3. Have little, if any, desire for sexual experiences with another person. 
  4. Enjoy few, if any, activities. Absence of pleasure concerns especially sensory, bodily and interpersonal experiences. 
  5. Missing close friends or close relatives except first-degree relatives. 
  6. Seems indifferent to praise or criticism.    
  7. Shows emotionally cold, reserved, or subdued emotions   

 

What helps with schizoid personality disorder?

The treatment of personality disorders aims to create better social functioning and adaptation. In addition, attempts are made to reduce acute symptoms, such as psychosis. Furthermore, support is provided to ride out crises in relation to those closest to them.

In the treatment context, personality disorders are divided into two groups: mild and severe personality disorders. The mild personality disorders include avoidant, obsessive-compulsive and dependent personality disorders, while the rest are considered among the most severe.

The main treatment for the mild personality disorders is long-term psychotherapy. This is done by a specialist. Some will need additional treatment for depression and anxiety.

In the case of severe personality disorders, hospitalization and medical treatment in crises may be necessary, in addition to long-term psychotherapy. Supportive talks with a general practitioner may also be relevant.