Find help for mental health problems

United States

 

Find treatment and therapy providers to support recovery from mental health problems in the United States.

Photo: by Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash


The mission of helpseeker.net is to make it easier to find help for mental health problems.

The novel contribution by helpseeker.net is that we make it easier to find directories of available help where you live - all in one place.

In this article, we present directories of treatment, therapy and care provides that are relevant for individuals residing in the United States.

 

find-help-mental-health-problems

Find treatment facilities and mental health services in your area

If you or someone you know has a mental illness or is struggling emotionally, there are ways to get help. Please choose your location below to find other mental health services in your area:

Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia (DC) Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Puerto Rico South Dakota Rhode Island South Carolina Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington state West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming 

 

Selected directories

Here is a summary of treatment, therapy and care providers related to mental health problems.

 

 

 

Other options of help

Therapy or online therapy can be supplemented with other forms of help. Examples are:

 

  1. Support / self-help groups. Can take a variety of forms, from providing a safe and supportive social environment; activities and hobbies; more or less structured structured group meetings; information and guidance relating to how to use available help services; and a lot more.

    While it is difficult to know the effectiveness of such services, due to very different compositions of support and self-help services, the research generally show the self-help groups may have important benefits for the participants [Kurouz et al., 2002][1] .

  2. Helplines and chats: Different helplines and chats exist. Some helplines are specialized in providing you with information and guidance, while others are more specialized in providing emotional support. Some helplines are highly professional, while others are more based on voluntary workers, that merely wish to be a caring listener.

    It is difficult to evalute how effective such services are, and it probably depends on many factors. For example, while the state of the science regarding the effectiveness of crisis response services remains limited, overall results provide support for such services [Hoffberg et al, 2020][2] .

  3. Online communities and forums: This is an option to get in contact with other individuals that struggle with something similar to you or someone you know. Some communities are moderated by professional health workers, while most of them are not.

    Online communities is traditionally not understood as a support or health service, but rather a social area - that may have the potential of being supportive for the individual that uses it. Importantly, research has shown that "people with serious mental illness report benefits from interacting with peers online from greater social connectedness, feelings of group belonging and by sharing personal stories and strategies for coping with day-to-day challenges of living with a mental illness. Within online communities, individuals with serious mental illness could challenge stigma through personal empowerment and providing hope. By learning from peers online, these individuals may gain insight about important health care decisions, which could promote mental health care seeking behaviours" [Naslund et al., 2016][3] .

    This seems to indicate that online communites should not be underevaluated as a potential resource to recovery, coping and enhanced quality of life for people affected by mental health problems.

 

References & Footnotes
  1. Kurouz et al., 2002: Kyrouz, E. M., Humphreys, K., & Loomis, C. (2002). A review of research on the effectiveness of self-help mutual aid groups. British Journal of Clinical Psychology33, 198-200.
  2. Hoffberg et al, 2020: Hoffberg, A. S., Stearns-Yoder, K. A., & Brenner, L. A. (2020). The effectiveness of crisis line services: A systematic review. Frontiers in public health7, 399.
  3. Naslund et al., 2016: Naslund, J. A., Aschbrenner, K. A., Marsch, L. A., & Bartels, S. J. (2016). The future of mental health care: peer-to-peer support and social media. Epidemiology and psychiatric sciences25(2), 113-122.